Home Blog  






1 Jul 2015

C055_1

Unipolar 4-Phase Stepper Motor Controller Board will help you control a Stepper Motor or 4 individual Solenoids. This circuit consisting of transistors that serve as current amplifier and also diode to prevent damaging back EMF, circuit uses Darlington transistors to provide high current capacity to unipolar stepper motor. Just provide sequence of pulse using Micro-Controller or descript circuit to roll out the unipolar motor. On board High Watt resistor to control the current, value of the resistor can be set as per your load current requirement.

Unipolar 4-Phase Stepper Motor Controller – [Link]

30 Jun 2015

The usage of BLDC motor is already increasing due to its efficiency in driving motors with lesser power requirement. It runs with a digital signal controller IC that has processing power of a 32-bit DSP and a functionality of the microcontroller with a flexible set of peripherals. Due this flexibility in configuration, the designed system will be able to optimize its functionality. The instruction set is highly efficient for C compilers that enable rapid development of optimized control applications.

The design is comprised of a MC56F82313VLC digital signal controller that serves as the direct controller of the system. It sends the pwm signal to the Insulated-Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) in which the IGBT provides the very efficient switching to drive the BLDC motor. The IGBTs provides low switching loss and improved protection characteristics for simpler electrical and mechanical construction of the design. The host controller it enables the universal control of the motor.

The design is applicable to computer fans and some industrial motor control. This will also provide an opportunity to motor applications to have a very efficient digital signal control that brings less power consumption feature to the entire system.

BLDC Motor Control using Digital Signal Controllers – [Link]

25 Jun 2015

UC3844_PWM_TRACE

Dilshan Jayakody writes:

UC3844 is popular current mode controller which is commonly found on DC-to-DC converter circuits and switch mode power supplies. This motor speed controller is also based on UC3844 and it is specifically design to drive 20V – 24V DC motors.

In this given configuration UC3844 produces (approx.) 50kHz to 240kHz PWM output and this range can be adjust by changing the value of C2 timing capacitor. As per the datasheet UC3844 is capable to produce PWM output frequency up to 1MHz.

UC3844 base motor speed controller – [Link]

4 Jun 2015

DIY-Dual-Stepper-Motor-Driver-Shield-for-Arduino-in-action-620x549

Stepper motors are brushless DC motors which can move in discrete steps thanks to the special coil arrangement inside. They are very popular in DIY and industry projects which require accurate mechanical movement control. In this SoloPCB project, we are building a dual stepper motor driver shield based on two Allegro A4988 ICs which can supply up to 35V and 2A and provide overcurrent and thermal protection.

DIY Dual Stepper Motor Driver Shield for Arduino – [Link]


28 May 2015

20150506_214129-600x400

Dan blogged about his Servo tester with OLED display project:

The problem is simple: I need to have a reliable and easy to use servo tester, that I can use to test/play with a standard RC servo or ESC or anything else that uses the same control protocol. This necessity has arisen again quite recently, while working on the 2nd iteration of my ball balancing device.

Double RC servo tester with OLED display – [Link]

26 May 2015

In a DC motor, the stator is a permanent magnet and the rotor has the windings, which are excited with a current. The current in the rotor is reversed to create a rotating or moving electric field by means of a split commutator and brushes. On the other hand, in a BLDC motor, the windings are on the stator and the rotor is a permanent magnet, hence the term inside-out DC motor is coined.

To make the rotor turn, there must be a rotating electric field, typically a three-phase BLDC motor has three stator phases that are excited two at a time to create a rotating electric field. This method is fairly easy to implement, but to prevent the permanent magnet rotor from getting locked with the stator; the excitation on the stator must be sequenced in a specific manner while knowing the exact position of the rotor magnets. Position information can be gotten by hall effect sensors that detect the rotor magnet position.

The dsPIC30F2010 is a 28-pin 16-bit MCU specifically designed for embedded motor control applications. The six MCPWM pin outputs are connected to three MOSFET driver pairs (IR2101S), which in turn are connected to six MOSFETs (IRFR2407). These MOSFETs are connected in a three-phase bridge format to the three BLDC motor windings. MOSFET drivers also require a higher voltage (15V) to operate, the motor is a 24V BLDC motor so the DC+ to DC- bus voltage is 24V and a regulated 5V is provided to drive the dsPIC30F2010. The three Hall effect sensor inputs are connected to input pins that have Change Notification circuits associated with them. These inputs are enabled along with their interrupt. If a change occurs on any of these three pins, an interrupt is generated. To provide a speed demand, a potentiometer is connected to an ADC input (RB2).

To start and stop the motor, a push button switch is provided at RC14. To provide some current feedback to the motor, a low value resistor (25 milliohms) is connected between the DC- bus voltage and ground or Vss. The voltage generated by this resistor is amplified by an external op amp (MCP6002) and fed to an ADC input (RB1).

Sensored BLDC Motor Control – [Link]

21 May 2015

IMG_1703

robertgawron.blogspot.com

I will start from saying that the board could be replaced by any Arduino plus some(s) its motor driver shield(s). So why I made it you may ask? Well, while I made this tiny tank-robot model presented on below pictures, I wanted to make at least some things by myself, and decide what I need and how I need it instead of only buying prefabricated stuff.

Simple and extensible microprocessor driver for robots – [Link]

20 Apr 2015

P1090837a

by berryjam.eu:

I used specialized triple half bridge IC L6234 (~ 8$). You can make the same spending less money (but more time) with MOSFET transistors or other IC.

L6234 datasheet is surprisingly useless. Go straight to Application Note AN1088 instead.

I added current limiting resistors (1kΩ) to all INputs and ENable pins, a bunch of capacitors recommended in application note and current sensing shunt resistor 0.6Ω (big blue one).

Spining BLDC motors at super Slow speeds with Arduino and L6234 – [Link]

26 Mar 2015

20150322012942-pet

3D Printers, CNC Mills, Laser cutters, Pick n Place robots…Brainboard v2 will rule them all!

Brainboard v2 is a modular CNC controller board based on LPC1768/69 Cortex-M3 chip. Due to its modular design it allows easier upgrades as per requirements and easy replacement if there is any broken part. It runs on open source Smoothie modular firmware and is targeted at 3D Printers, Laser cutters, CNC Mills, Pick and Place and other small or Mid-size CNC machines. Upgrade your machines for higher performance and features.

Brainboard v2: Demon of CNC controllers – [Link]

21 Feb 2015


This schematic shows the TI AMC1200 in a motor control application.  The motor phase current is measured at the resistor (RSHUNT), and the signal is processed through an RC filter before reaching the AMC1200.  Also shown are optional protection capacitors C3 and C4.  The TI AMC1200 get its high side power from the power supply of the upper gate driver, and a 5.1V zener diode regulates the voltage.  The high transient immunity of the AMC1200 and AMC1200B ensures reliable and accurate operation even in high-noise environments such as the power stages of the motor drives.

Motor Control using TI AMC1200 – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits