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8 Jul 2015

The solar energy collection is not that easy compared to the different types of power generation system because it has the lowest capacity factor. It has 5 out of 24 hours in a day that it can generate electricity from its solar collection. The only solution to this is by optimizing the 5 hours solar energy collection. This design features a solar tracker with Light-Dependent Resistor (LDR). The system is managed by a S08 MCU of Freescale. It has flash and RAM access protection that can be used in embedded development security. The system has its own protection such as illegal opcode detection with reset and illegal address detection with reset. It has also power-saving modes in which a peripheral clock-enable-register can disable the clocks of unused modules.

The design is comprised of a MC9S08PA16AVLC 8-bit MCU, S08 core, 16KB Flash that serves as the main controller of the system. It directs the movement of the servo motor with respect to the data gathered by the LDRs. It has four LDRs that will be able to locate accurately the solar radiation at its optimum point while behind these LDRs is the movable solar panel. The solar panel movement is handled by the servo motor that is also controlled by the MCU. The vertical servo is used to adjust the inclination of the panel while horizontal servo is used to adjust the horizontal position of the panel. The smart battery serves as the energy storage of the solar module that can trip off the supplies produced by the solar panel preventing it from overcharging.

The design is applicable to different types of solar module that will be able to optimize their solar energy application. It can be used in a basic robotic arm development since it features the minor movement capability of a robot or use it as a reference in the development of more sophisticated system.

Optimized Solar Tracking System – [Link]

10 Jun 2015

emon

by dkroeske @ github.com:

A cheap 555 timer chip acting as Schmitt trigger combined with a phototransistor or LDR is taped to the ‘flashing light’ or ‘pulsing magnet’ on the electricity meter. The output of the 555 timer chip is connected to one of the GPIO pins on the Raspberry Pi. A Python script (executing in the background) recording 555 events is calculating actual energy usage [e.g. Watt] every time the 555 is signaling and stores epochs in an SQLite3 database. From this, another Python script (executed from e.g. cron) generates all kinds of energy usage information (e.g. kWh or kWday or whatever). Using Node.js (running on the same Pi) all data is ‘RESTified’ enabling spreading out to the W3. To maintain privacy JSON web tokens are required every time the service is queried. Oh, and there is also a Pimatic plugin available (here)

Emon-server – 555 Timer as power usage sensor – [Link]

6 Sep 2014

master_clock_16a

by embedded-lab.com:

Brett’s new masterclock is Arduino-controlled and keeps very accurate time by periodically synchronizing with the DCF77 “Atomic” Clock in Mainflingen near Frankfurt, Germany. The DCF77  library for Arduino is used to decode the time signal broadcasted from the atomic clock. The time is displayed as hours, minutes, and seconds on six 1″ seven segment LEDs. A 4×20 I2C LCD display is also used in the project to display additional info such as display brightness, sync information, signal quality, auto tune’d frequency, auto tuned quartz accuracy, etc. Both the displays are auto-dimmed based on the surrounding light intensity using an LDR sensor and pulse width modulation technique. His clock also includes a bluetooth link for updating the Arduino firmware from a PC without an USB cable.

Very accurate master clock synchronized to the DCF77 time signal – [Link]

30 Mar 2014

dsc07095

ZXLee built a simple sensor for Arduino which allows him to detect colors. The idea lies behind using red, green, blue LEDs and Light Dependent Resistor (LDR). Lee Zhi Xian writes:

Previously I have made a colour sensor using Arduino but don’t have the time to update it on my blog. Today I am going to share the details of this mini project. Basically, the sensor consists of three LEDs and Light Dependent Resistor (LDR). The LDR will detect the colour and display it to another RGB LED. Besides display it on the RGB LED, the colour will also display on PC. RGB LED is commonly used in display colours on LCD or OLED such as the monitor and television.

[via]

Simple technique of sensing colors using Arduino – [Link]


24 Jul 2013

FTSA2Y5GZUASP9U.LARGE

janw @ instructables.com writes:

A few months ago, I saw an instructable by fjordcarver on how to build a coloursensor with an RGB led and an LDR. It inspired me to try whether I could improve his design.

Here are the things that I wanted:
The sensor should have as few pins as possible.
It should work as a stand-alone device. All calculations should be done on the device.
It should have a triggered mode and a continuous mode.
All parameters should be programmable.
Calibration parameters should be stored in the EEPROM of the microcontroller.
Firmware updates should be made possible
And finally: size does matter ⇒ The smaller the better.

I did choose an smd attiny85 as the brain of the sensor. It has a small footprint but a large enough flash for the calculations. It also has just enough pins for the project (all eight pins are used).instructables.com

Build your own (at)tiny colour sensor – [Link]

23 Dec 2012

eed5b4e3e3ea378cc151e027d34cc780

TrH Meter is a DIY microcontroller-based indoor thermometer plus hygrometer that displays temperature (F/C) and relative humidity on 4 seven segment LED displays which adjust their brightness level according to the surrounding illumination. The displays are 1 inch big, emits bright yellow color, and are readable from more than 50 ft away. It consists of a closed loop system that continuously assesses ambient light condition using an inexpensive light-dependent resistor (LDR) and uses that information to adjust the brightness of the display. The DHT11 sensor is used to measure temperature and relative humidity. The microcontroller used in this project is PIC16F688, and it runs at 4 MHz internal clock. A separate display driver chip (MAX7219) is used to control and refresh the display data on the seven segment LEDs. A 3-position slide switch controls power ON/OFF and Fahrenheit (F) or Celsius (C) scale select for temperature display. You can now preorder the project kit for a discounted price of $25 on Tindie. You will receive a preprogrammed PIC16F688 microcontroller in the kit.

TrH Meter project kit is now available for preorder on Tindie – [Link]

16 Dec 2012

TRHMeterPrototypeOP2

This project is about building a microcontroller-based digital room thermometer plus hygrometer that displays temperature and relative humidity on 4 large (1 inch) seven segment LED displays which adjust their brightness level according to the surrounding illumination. It consists of a closed loop system that continuously assesses ambient light condition using an inexpensive light-dependent resistor (LDR) and uses that information to adjust the brightness of the display. An inexpensive DHT11 sensor is used to measure temperature and relative humidity. The microcontroller used in this project is PIC16F688, and it runs at 4 MHz clock generated from its internal source. A separate display driver chip (MAX7219) is used to control and refresh the display data on the seven segment LEDs.

TrH Meter: A DIY indoor thermometer plus hygrometer with adaptive brightness – [Link]

4 Jul 2012

Raj from Embedded Lab shows in his latest tutorial guide how to implement adaptive brightness control to seven segment LED displays for optimum readability in all illumination conditions. The technique has been demonstrated by constructing a temperature and humidity meter that adapts the brightness of the seven segment LED displays to the surrounding lighting conditions.The project uses a general purpose LDR to sense the surrounding illumination and MAX7219 to drive the LED display.

How to implement auto-brightness adjustment to seven segment LED displays – [Link]

 

19 Jan 2012

embedded-lab.com writes:

Measurement of light intensity is a prime necessity in several occasions.  The diversity of such needs make their way to various branches of physics and engineering as well as in media. For instance, in engineering, such kinds of measurements are needed to design optimum lighting conditions of a room. In photography, light intensity measurements ensure good quality pictures by determining the right exposure. Wiring a phototransistor or a light-dependent-resistor (LDR) with an analogue LED voltmeter chip like the LM3914 or even to a microcontroller and displaying the ADC values is a pretty simple technique of measuring light intensity. The bad part of this technique is that these simple and amateur-level devices can only measure relative intensity of light and are unable to provide measurements on an absolute scale. However, with a precise knowledge of the transfer characteristic (resistance vs light intensity) of the LDR it is possible to relate the LDR output to the intensity of light in standard unit. In case the LDR characteristic is unknown or unreliable, you can still calibrate the sensor output by using a variable light source and an external reference photometer. This project is about a microcontroller based light intensity meter where an LDR light sensor is calibrated against an external photometer to obtain the intensity of incoming light in the unit of lux. The lux is the SI unitm of illuminance and luminous emittance, and measures lumens per square meter (lm/m2). The microcontroller used in this project is ATMega8L and its firmware is written using mikroElektronika’s MikroC Pro for AVR compiler.

Building a digital light meter with a calibrated LDR – [Link]

26 Oct 2011

Chris The Carpenter has put together possibly the most complete robot module for the Propeller Platform. Called the 444AVXB, he writes… [via]

Let’s start with the name, 444-AVXB stands for:
4 Amps (2 amps x 2 motors) via a L298 motor driver
4 ADC’s (Analog inputs) via a MCP3204 chip
4 Servos with connections to power and with current-limiting resistors on the signal wires
Audio-out (non-amplified)
Video-out via a standard RCA jack
Connections for an X-bee
Connections for a BlueSmirf Bluetooth unit

he 444-AVXB was designed with the robot hobbyist in mind. Connections are available for just about every “standard” thing you would find on a small to medium-sized robot. A hefty motor driver handles decent-sized motors with nice screw terminals for both power and motor connections. (4) 3-pin connections are provided for servos which can be powered by either external power or on-board power. An ADC chip allows for 4 analog inputs to be read, great for analog sensors, pots, LDR’s etc.

Video-out takes advantage of the awesome video capability of the prop and can be connected to any TV with a “video-in” and/or many of the cheapie 7” LCD screens (found on Ebay). Audio is just that, audio out with the circuit being the same as can be found on many other propeller products. Pin 15 has been brought forward as well for a Ping))) sonar unit. Finally, there is room and connections for EITHER an X-bee or Bluetooth module. All unused pins are accessible via female headers.

A Robot Module with Everything – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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