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16 Jul 2015

20150707010217_Microchip-MTCH6303

by Martin Cooke @ elektormagazine.com:

Microchip has announced a new addition to its portfolio of human interface solutions. The MTCH6303 supports touch panel sensors with up to 1000 nodes and 10 inch diagonals. The device uses signal processing to filter noise and provide predictive tracking of up to 10 fingers, at scan rates of up to 250Hz with a minimum of 100Hz each for five touches. The projected-capacitive touch controller provides multi-touch coordinates as well as a ready-made multi-finger surface gesture suite that can bring modern user interface elements such as pinch and zoom, multifinger scrolling and swipes to any embedded design with minimal loading on the host processor. It can also be used with Microchip’s MTCH652 high-voltage line driver to achieve better SNR in noisy environments.

When combined with the MGC3130, the MTCH6303 solution is also capable of supporting 3D air gestures up to 20cm distance from the touch panel. Microchip’s MGC3130 E-field-based 3D tracking and gesture controller includes Microchip’s patented GestIC technology, allowing user input via natural hand and finger movements in free space.

Microchip Touch and Gesture Solutions – [Link]

26 Jul 2013

article-2013july-capacitive-touch-sensing-moves-fig4a

by Publitek European Editors:

This article describes the development of touch sensing and switching techniques capacitive sensing technology. Products cited include both stand-alone capacitive sensing controller ICs and microcontrollers (MCUs) that include touch sensing as a peripheral function. Capacitive touch sensing has experienced explosive growth to become the default human interface for several classes of consumer product. Users of tablets, smartphones, portable media players, and GPS systems now expect a sophisticated and responsive touch interface as a matter of course. This, in turn, has modified the expectations that the user base has of the smart device and domestic appliance markets; consumers now come, in effect, pre-programmed with the language of tap, drag, swipe, and pinch. High-end products that do not offer that mode of user interaction risk being “uncool”.

Capacitive Touch Sensing Moves from Exotic to Everyday – [Link]

17 Jun 2013

Finished-PCB

With LEDs that require only one pin, you can do a lot with even just a 6-pin microcontroller!

A touch controlled light with 4xWS2812 RGB LEDs and ATtiny10. This is a small hardware project which utilizes the light_WS2812 library and the TinyTouchLib to implement a touch-button controlled RGB-LED light. Only two output pins of the ATtiny10 are used. Atmel Studio project and Eagle files are included.

[via]

Tiny Touch Button – [Link]

21 May 2012

Toumas decided to code his own capacitive touch sensors based on a closed source Atmel example where a single ADC pin is used for capacitive sensing. He reverse engineered it, and documented his results: [via]

I’ve been thinking of a project that needs a little bit more elegant user interface than your usual push buttons. Partly inspired by a video blog on Dave Jones’ EEVblog, I decided to look into capacitive touch buttons. The big issue unfortunately for me was that you usually need a separate chip for capacitive touch sensing. With some tricks, you can however use a normal microcontroller to do the job. Even using only a single pin and resistor.

Capacitive touch sensing with a single ADC pin – [Link]


17 Apr 2012

Two independent touch switches housed in a single 8 pin chip. Power supply between 2V and 5V. New version 2.0 has Individually configurable momentary or latching operation.

Have you have ever wanted to add a simple touch switch to your project? Well now you can with our touch switch IC you can now add momentary or locking touch switch functionality.


Outputs can be momentary or latching

  • For momentary operation connect the CFG1 / CFG2 pin to Ground.
  • For latching operation, connect the CFG1 / CFG2 pin to +VDD.

Touch Switch IC – [Link]

23 Jan 2012

Giorgos Lazaridis writes:

An AC Hum touch sensor is a very special technique, rarely used for switching applications, because it has a great disadvantage. In order to operate normally, an active AC power line has to be near by. More info about this type of touch sensor, along with other types (including the capacitance method), can be found in the corresponding theory page, how the touch buttons work..

DIY AC Hum Touch Button – [Link]

31 Oct 2011

pyroelectro.com writes:

Touch screen or touch activated technology has been around for a few decades now, but only recently have prices dropped and the technology been (somewhat) perfected. As an input device touch screens offer a more natural interaction that humans are used to, which offers a great advantage for businesses selling to the general public over traditional keyboards and mouses.

This article will look at how to interface to a 4-wire resistive touch screen and find out the X and Y coordinates of the current point being touched. A minimal number of parts will be used to simplify the system hardware, and to focus more on the theory of how it works.

Simple Touch Screen Interface – [Link]

21 Jul 2011

 

Tic Tac Touch @ The Custom Geek… [via]

OK, so I haven’t posted in a while because I have been working on some bigger projects, but yesterday, I took a two hour break and made a 2 player tic tac toe game. I did this with an Arduino and a 2.8″ touchshield from Adafruit.com. It’s pretty basic tic tac toe, and has score tracking, game logic (you can’t go twice in a row, and telling you if you win), and the ability to consume a chunk of time playing tic tac toe with my son. Below is the code, feel free to hack modify etc. If you play against a smart person (or yourself), you will have lots of Mosfet eye games!

Tic Tac Touch – [Link]

30 Jun 2011

pcbheaven.com writes:

I believe that kids (and not only kids) that have their hands on electronics, wanted at least once in their lives to make an electronic keylock system for their house or room. When i was a kid, i had bought a Smart Kit Keycode lock system, and i had adapted it on the external door of my house. But this door had already the automatic-release mechanism. I only had to find which wires actuate this mechanism and hook the relay of the kit in parallel to this.

Then, i discovered that making a key-code circuit, is simple, very simple. As a matter of fact, so simple, that i designed this very simple key-code circuit, similar to the one from smart-kit but much better (mine had automatic reset operation when wrong code was entered), which took me only a few hours to design. Not to mention the microcontrollers… But why don’t i have a keycode-lock for my apartment’s door? Simple because it is expensive and needs a great mod on the door or frame.

Servo-Actuated Door Keylock Hack with capacitance touch-pad – [Link]

29 Jun 2011

civicbynature writes –

Thanks to jersagfast @ TheCustomGeek. He wrote an awesome menu program for adafruits 2.8tft breakout board. It has 5 different menu areas as well as a settings area for backlight brightness and sleep timers which saves the settings to EEPROM so the settings are saved even when there’s no power. Plus many more features. I have added many updates. It is now both UNO and Mega 1280/2560. compatible.

I have also added the ability to read actual Vcc voltages at the core using the Bandgap method For accurate voltage readings and sensor readings. And more. If you’d like to check out the latest code it’s available Here on my site.

Cool 2.8″ TFT Touch project… – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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